Flying by the Seat of Your Pants: When to Plan Your Travels

When aircraft first became suitable for long distance flight, pilots usually relied on compasses and other instruments as well as detailed flight plans to navigate the airways. Around that time in 1938, Douglas Corrigan made a transatlantic crossing in piece-of-junk plane with a broken compass and apparently no instruments, flight plan, or radio. After the flight from USA to Ireland a newspaper described him as a pilot who “flies by the seat of his pants,” meaning he relied solely on perception, intuition, and skill to Continue Reading →