Portland and Seattle – Two Nights, Two Cities – Part 2

To review, Daniel, Peyton, and I had just left Portland after visiting my friend Richard and getting a taste for some local food. Our next stop: Seattle. We only had one night in the city and nothing planned. Thirty minutes of scouting google maps resulted in a stop at Swan Creek Park for some spontaneous mountain biking. These trails were the best built on the trip—flowy, fast, and downhill. It was bound to happen to one of us, but I never expected to look up from a GoPro to see Daniel get too forward on his bike at the bottom of a slope and then launch into a flip over his handlebars, body and bicycle at once flying through the air and then bouncing across the packed dirt. He was shook up but fine. We rode back to the truck after another couple laps and locked targets on Fremont.

Riley was one of the coolest dudes we met on the trip. A tall guy in his mid-twenties, tan with dark hair, Riley taught acting at a local school in Seattle. He also acted on Disney cruise ships for months at a time. Back up two days now: the guys and I are sitting around a campfire in Oregon trying to decide where to stay in Seattle. None of my Couchsurfing requests had been accepted, and we were leaning towards booking a cheap hotel outside the city. Then, while looking through hotels and hostels on my phone, I received the notification. Riley last minute agreed to host us two days before our arrival.

Now fast forward again. We just left Swan Creek Park and became stuck in miserable Seattle traffic at about 4:30 pm. Riley texted me along the lines of, “Hey do you guys like salmon.” I, of course, said we did. Riley said something like, “Great! I’m cooking dinner so don’t eat before you get here.” Anticipation and hunger made 20 mph traffic seem like standstill, and so what felt like 4 hours later we pulled onto Riley’s street where he met us all with a smile and a hug. He pointed out our parking spot and then showed us inside where Kenai, his new-ish and excitable pup, greeted us happily. Then, we all dug into the best meal we had on the entire trip. Riley made and had waiting seared salmon on a rice pilaf with sautéed veggies and peppers drizzled in a homemade hollandaise sauce. He apparently was a huge fan of Food Network, and by default, so were we.

Still trying to understand how the food was so delicious, we set off to see Fremont on foot, led by our host. Riley took us around Gas Works Park (formerly the Seattle Gas Light Company gasification plant), under the bridge with the Fremont Troll, and past the Lenin statue. We ended that night at a barcade (Bar/Arcade) called Add a Ball that housed a ton of vintage games. The low-lit, grungy atmosphere seemed to draw a crowd of nerds and bedraggled misfits who blended perfectly with the surroundings. They seemed at home and welcomed us, too, into their humble abode.

I’ve said it before, but I believe everyone should at some point try Couchsurfing, at least once. It’s an amazing way to experience a city because it’s just like visiting your friend who has lived there long enough to become a local. They know where to go, when to go there, and what’s worth doing. My two hosts have been extremely kind, welcoming, and accommodating. But “host” isn’t a great word for them because after fifteen minutes we’re all friends. You can chat about absolutely nothing, swap travel stories, learn about each other’s background, engage in deep and meaningful conversations, or just hangout rather quietly. No matter what, you will leave with a new friend and a new perspective.

The next morning Riley cooked for everyone again: fluffy pancakes, crispy bacon, squared potatoes. Again, amazing food. We drove to REI, the one where it all began, to pick up some last minute supplies. Wanting a quick lunch and apparently missing the south, we settled on picking up Popeye’s chicken, which we ate in a funeral home parking lot. Yes, a funeral home parking lot. Next to a cemetery. The Cemetery where sits the Jimi Hendrix memorial. Stuffed with fried chicken, we walked over and paid our respects to the legend. Then, slightly anxious but thoroughly overjoyed, we prepared for our flight. The vast wilds of Denali awaited.

A Brotherhood Forged in Bad Fishing – The Plan

By Alex Cagle,

In an earlier article I detailed how fishing cemented Clint’s and my friendship. As we set our sights on late May to early June for a summer fishing trip, we settled on Arkansas, an ideal spot due to close proximity and its two main features: hiking and fishing. We broke up the trip into two parts and each of us oversaw planning one part. Both of us wanted to hike and fish, but we were not equally enamored by each activity. While Clint was more excited about hiking and took charge of that portion, I most looked forward to fishing and planned it accordingly. Clint researched online and found that the best hiking trails in Arkansas are in the Ozarks, near the Buffalo National River. So, he found a beautiful campsite on the river where we would first set up shop.

For my location I knew exactly where I wanted to camp and fish in Arkansas: Lake Ouachita. Damned in 1953, and the Ouachita River created the lakes Ouachita, Hamilton, and Victoria near Hot Springs, Arkansas. I knew I wanted to go to Ouachita because as a kid my family would sometimes vacation there, and I always wanted to camp on an island in the lake. One summer my family camped on an island, but we chose the island poorly. As we unloaded our gear onto the island we inadvertently tracked it through poison ivy, so the next morning both my parents woke up covered head to foot in poison ivy. We canceled our trip early and headed home. However, my desire to camp on an island remained, and Clint was just as gung-ho about the idea as I was, so we had our two locations set.

Next, we fell right into the details of planning. We had already planned when, the end of May, and now we knew where. Our next question, “What do we need?” This trip was going to be my first camping trip with all my own gear as an adult. The only problem was…I had no gear! Clint being the expert camper that he is sent me a list of all the essential items I would need to bring. So I set about either borrowing or buying the stuff I needed. The hardest thing to get was a large camping backpack. I didn’t want to spend money and buy one that I would use very little, but I still needed one. Luckily I was able to borrow one from a friend at church who camps and hikes quite often. One thing I did have to buy was a small cooking set. I found a great deal on Amazon that included a pot, pan, utensils, drawstring bag, cup, and most importantly a head lamp! The headlamp proved to be the deciding factor, so I bought it.

The very last thing that I had to get was food. We intended—note the word “intend” because this will come into play later in the story—to eat the fish we caught while we were fishing. Yet, we didn’t want to leave all our meat to the fish, so I went to the store and loaded up. I bought three bags of jerky, ten bags of instant mashed potatoes, 8 bags of instant rice, and twenty cliff bars. After the trip I would learn that I grossly overestimated how much food I would need for a five-day excursion. Once we had everything bought we were finally ready to leave on our adventure (the suspense for which is now thoroughly killing you).